Magnus Chase and the Ship of the Dead – Book Review

MagnusChaseShipofDead

Title: Magnus Chase and the Ship of the Dead
Author: Rick Riordan
Published: October 3rd 2017 by Puffin
eBook: 423 pages
My Rating: 5/5 stars

Summary (from Goodreads): Loki the trickster god is free from his chains. Now he’s readying Naglfar, the Ship of the Dead, armed with a host of giants and zombies, to sail against the Norse gods and begin the final battle of Ragnarok. It’s up to Magnus Chase and his friends to stop Loki’s plans, but to do so they will have to sail across the oceans of Midgard, Jotunheim and Niflheim in a desperate race to reach Naglfar before it’s ready to sail on Midsummer’s Day.

Along the way, they will face angry sea gods, hostile giants, and an evil fire-breathing dragon who happens to be a former acquaintance. But Magnus’s biggest challenge will be facing his own inner demons. To defeat Loki, Magnus will need to use words, not force. This will require finding a magical elixir so deadly that it will either make Magnus Chase powerful enough to out-talk the silver-tongued Loki, or destroy Magnus utterly.

GUYS THIS WAS SO GOOD

Can it be said that I love Magnus Chase more than I love Percy Jackson?

…I think that maybe it can.

Something that I LOVE about this series is how all-inclusive it is. Representation of race, religion, disability, gender and sexuality. Yes please. There is a character in this series for everyone to relate to and it really warms my heart to see how far the author has come from the original Percy Jackson series that was white as snow and straight as a ruler.

A quick run through of the characters (because there are a lot of mains and I love them all):
– Magnus, my son. Okay, he’s actually the son of Frey, but y’know. Love him anyway. Sarcastic cinnamon roll.

– Samirah al Abbas. What a queen. Positive Muslim representation too, she is fasting for nearly the entirety of this book and still manages to hold her own in a fight.

– Alex Fierro: My other queen. I just…didn’t think it possible that I could love another character in this series more than Hearth, but apparently I was wrong. Alex is such an amazingly complex character and I really just need another book with him/her in it.

– Hearthstone: My favourite. Just. My favourite, since the beginning. He’s the most sweet-tempered character and I’m upset that he lost his scarf. Also lots of magic and sorcery from him because yes.

– Blitzen: Ah yes, Blitz. I felt like he didn’t get so much page-time in this book? (Same with Sam, actually) because we had more characters to explore. It would’ve been nice to have a bit more of him, but what we did have was good, so thumbs up.

– Mallory Keen: We literally had zero backstory on her for the first two books, so thanks for expanding on this. Her character finally feels somewhat fleshed out and I respect her more now that I know how she ended up at the Hotel.

– Halfborn: As above, we got more backstory. Although, I still feel like he could’ve been expanded slightly more. Who knows.

– Thomas Jefferson Junior: My, my. Again, I knew literally nothing about him. This book turned that around and I have a soft spot for this guy. He just…makes me smile.
Yeah, I like that this book kinda managed to reintroduce us to the last three characters, because for the first 2/3 of the series they all felt pretty flat.

My other favourite part is that Magnus isn’t the child of prophecy, or of the most famous god – he’s weak and appallingly bad in a fight (think Bilbo Baggins trying to brandish a sword at the end of An Unexpected Journey) but I love him. His talents lie in healing and caring for his friends and I honestly love that so much. I’m using the word love a lot, and I don’t use it very often to describe people.
Magnus’s snark is legendary and THE CHAPTER TITLES, PEOPLE. My favourite part of the book (well, almost) is reading them. Highlights include:

  • Percy Jackson Does His Level Best to Kill Me
  • Nothing Happens. It’s a Miracle.
  • We Devise a Fabulously Horrible Plan
  • We Devise a Horribly Fabulous Plan
  • I Become as Poetic as…Like, a Poetic Person
  • If You Understand What Happens in This Chapter, Please Tell Me, Because I Have No Clue
  • The Chase Space Becomes a Place

Okay so that last one is simply there because it rhymes. And also because I nearly cried at the last chapter.

I need more of this, okay? You cannot just leave a series like that, Mr Riordan. Just sayin.

If I’m actually being honest, the plot gets repetitive. It’s tried and true, and never fails to entertain me, BUT…I could do with something slightly different now.

This one is better for me than The Dark Prophecy, which I gotta admit started to bore me a bit. Much better than that.
Not quite on the same level as House of Hades though, because let’s be honest, that book is probably the best we’ve ever had.

Do you guys agree? Does anyone have a favourite Riordan book?

Holly xx

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Peter Darling – Book Review

peter darling.jpg

(image via http://www.pexels.com)

Title: Peter Darling
Author: Austin Chant
Ebook: 18 Chapters
Published: February 2017 by Less Than Three Press
My Rating: 3.5/5 stars

Summary (from Goodreads): Ten years ago, Peter Pan left Neverland to grow up, leaving behind his adolescent dreams of boyhood and resigning himself to life as Wendy Darling. Growing up, however, has only made him realize how inescapable his identity as a man is.

But when he returns to Neverland, everything has changed: the Lost Boys have become men, and the war games they once played are now real and deadly. Even more shocking is the attraction Peter never knew he could feel for his old rival, Captain Hook—and the realization that he no longer knows which of them is the real villain.

This was an interesting book for me.

On one hand, I really enjoyed it.

On the other hand, I had a few issues with it.

Starting with positives:
– I finished it in one sitting, which I haven’t done in AGES. It takes quite the book to keep me hooked like that.
– REPRESENTATION
– Seriously, transgender Peter Pan
– Never thought I’d see the day…but this was awesome.
– Also gay representation too, the main love story is a same sex couple
– The humour was on point. I knew I loved the book when I read this sentence on the second page:

“Samuel was walking ahead, where Hook could admire his arse.”

The shock factor made me grin more than anything, in that case.

I did however have a few negatives…

I just didn’t like how the Lost Boys were portrayed. I understand that is all part of the plot, fair enough. I just…they are some of my favourite characters in literature and they were basically stripped of any individuality and character that they had (which isn’t much to start with).

There were some nice touches, and I did feel for Peter, especially when he went back to his parents (whom I have never wanted to slap so hard in any adaptation of this novel.) I also liked Ernest, although we never scratched the surface of his character either.

The plot felt very simplistic too…I mean, I was engaged, sure. But I wasn’t entirely satisfied with the story and the ending. It felt more like a fanfiction than a novel (which is something I get a lot with retellings of Peter Pan and Alice in Wonderland.) The story felt rushed, like action scene after action scene, with no time to get to know the characters.

One thing that I adore is the front cover (I’m sorry!!!). But seriously, look at this majesty:

Peter Darling Cover.jpg

Ahem.
Anyway.

All round, it’s a solid book – it’s enjoyable, it contains representation and the humour is on point.

(One quick warning, if you’re planning on reading this one; there is a somewhat explicit scene in the novel, so you may want to skip a few pages if that makes you uncomfortable)

See you guys later with another post! (And sorry it took me sooo long to update this one!!)

Holly xx